Because of the Times is the third album by Kings of Leon. Because of the Times was released on March 30, 2007 in Ireland/Australia, April 2, 2007 in the UK and April 3, 2007 in the US (see 2007 in music).

The album has received generally positive reviews and has appeared in numerous Top-10 lists for “Album of the Year. In 2009, Clash named the album number 3 on the “Clash Essential 50”, a list of the most important albums released since the magazine’s inception in 2004.

The album was #6 in NME albums of the year, as well as #31 on Rolling Stone’s Top 50 Albums of 2007. NME said that the album “cements Kings Of Leon as one of the great American bands of our times” and Entertainment Weekly called Because of the Times “an epic wide-screen movie of a CD and the band’s best to date.”

Another reviewer described Because of the Times as, “an accomplished album of unbelievable beauty and familiar, loveable grit. Kings of Leon is maturing wonderfully and with patience, not forcing anything musically or lyrically that doesn’t sound natural.”

“Fly Farm Blues” is a song by rock musician Jack White. The song was written and used for the rock documentary film, It Might Get Loud which featured White, along with Jimmy Page and The Edge. It was released by White’s record label Third Man Records and online.

The song was written by White during the filming of It Might Get Loud a documentary featuring White, after director Davis Guggenheim and he had discussed that songs nowadays are over-prepared and over-produced. Guggenheim, however, disagreed and White wrote and recorded “Fly Farm Blues” in ten minutes. The song was used in the soundtrack for It Might Get Loud. read more

Blunderbuss is the debut solo album by Jack White, released on April 23, 2012 through White’s own label Third Man Records in association with XL Recordings and Columbia Records. The album was released in MP3, compact disc, and vinyl editions. The album was written, recorded, and produced entirely by White in 2011. The first single from the album, “Love Interruption”, was released on January 30, 2012 through White’s website and Third Man Records website. The album debuted at number one on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 138,000 copies. The album received Grammy Award nominations for Album of the Year and Best Rock Album at the 2013 Grammy Awards, while the single “Freedom at 21” was nominated for Best Rock Song.

Blunderbuss has its roots in White’s recordings with several artists, including Tom Jones. White was in contact with Wu-Tang Clan member RZA and, when RZA couldn’t attend the session, White felt bad since there was a band that travelled to Nashville for apparently no reason.[citation needed] White decided to record several tracks that he wrote in the last 6 months of 2011, with the band. The tracks would later develop into songs that appear on the album. read more

“Lonely Boy” is a song by American rock band The Black Keys. It is the opening track from their 2011 studio album El Camino and was released as the record’s lead single on October 26, 2011. The song is also the A-side of a promotional 12-inch single that was released in commemoration of Record Store Day’s “Back to Black” Friday event. The single was accompanied by a popular one-shot music video of a man dancing and lip-synching the lyrics.

“Lonely Boy” became one of the group’s most successful singles. It topped several rock radio charts, including the Alternative Songs and Rock Songs charts in the US, and the Alternative Rock and Active Rock charts in Canada.

On the singles charts, “Lonely Boy” was the group’s highest-charting song in several countries, peaking at number 64 on the Billboard Hot 100, number 2 on the Australian Singles Chart, and number 33 on the Canadian Hot 100. At the 2013 Grammy Awards, the song won awards for Best Rock Performance and Best Rock Song, while also receiving a nomination for Record of the Year.

“Lonely Boy” is 3:13 in length. The song was written by Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney with producer Danger Mouse. The song is played in the key of E minor, with only three chords used throughout the song. “Lonely Boy” is set in the time signature of common time with a tempo of 171 beats per minute. According to Auerbach, the guitar riff was inspired by Johnny Burnette’s cover of “Train Kept A-Rollin'”. The guitar line features a dive bomb although Auerbach uses a Boss Super Shifter pedal to achieve the effect.

Blunderbuss is the debut solo album by Jack White, released on April 23, 2012 through White’s own label Third Man Records in association with XL Recordings and Columbia Records. The album was released in MP3, compact disc, and vinyl editions. The album was written, recorded, and produced entirely by White in 2011. The first single from the album, “Love Interruption”, was released on January 30, 2012 through White’s website and Third Man Records website. The album debuted at number one on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 138,000 copies. The album received Grammy Award nominations for Album of the Year and Best Rock Album at the 2013 Grammy Awards, while the single “Freedom at 21” was nominated for Best Rock Song.

Blunderbuss has its roots in White’s recordings with several artists, including Tom Jones. White was in contact with Wu-Tang Clan member RZA and, when RZA couldn’t attend the session, White felt bad since there was a band that travelled to Nashville for apparently no reason.[citation needed] White decided to record several tracks that he wrote in the last 6 months of 2011, with the band. The tracks would later develop into songs that appear on the album. read more

The Big Come Up is the debut album by the American rock duo The Black Keys, released in 2002 on Alive Records. It was produced by drummer Patrick Carney. According to Nielsen Soundscan, the record has sold 139,000 copies.[5] In 2005, music critic Chuck Klosterman singled out The Big Come Up as one of 21 “high-quality albums” from the previous three years.[6]
The song “I’ll Be Your Man” was used as the theme song for the HBO series Hung. “I’ll Be Your Man” also appeared on the FX series Rescue Me. Alive Records re-presses this album regularly, often several times a year on different coloured vinyl or with altered sleeve artwork. These are usually marketed as limited editions.[7] As of January 2012, Alive Records had released The Big Come Up on vinyl on at least 14 separate occasions,[8] opening themselves up to criticism, particularly in regard to the marketing term “limited edition”.[9]
“240 Years Before Your Time” becomes silent at about 1:39 into the track on the CD version. This silence lasts until 23:21.

“Tighten Up” is a song by American rock band The Black Keys. It is the third track on their 2010 album Brothers and was released as the record’s first single on May 18, 2010.[3][4] Dan Auerbach told The Sun how the song originated: “That was the last song we did for the record. We had a couple of days off and so did Brian (Danger Mouse) and since we are friends and like hanging out with each other we thought it would be fun to go into the studio and see if we could come up with a tune. We always have a blast when the three of us get together.”[5]
“Tighten Up” has been licensed to appear in the video game FIFA 11, the music video games Rocksmith and Rock Band 3 (as downloadable content for both), the television program Gossip Girl, a Subaru commercial,a Molson commercial and the films I Am Number Four and Bad Teacher. The song has become one of the most successful Black Keys singles in the United States, being their song to chart on the Billboard Hot 100 and reaching number one on the Alternative Songs and Rock Songs charts.[6] Rolling Stone put the song on its list of the 15 Best Whistling Songs of All Time.[7] At the 53rd Grammy Awards in 2011, the song won Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, while also receiving a nomination for Best Rock Song. Musically, the song is in the key of F sharp minor. Read more…

Throughout a career that has spanned five decades, from the Yardbirds to solo stardom, landing him in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, guitarist Jeff Beck has continued to defy expectations. Steadfastly refusing to bow to convention, or even to straightjacket his performances into any critical pigeonhole, Beck’s sound is continuously in flux, skipping like a stone across a pond, dancing with hard rock, blues, jazz, and even flirting with the metallic.

Grammy winning guitarist and rock n roll legend Jeff Beck returns with his first album in seven years and what an album! The album is eclectic to say the least, it not only features the vocal talents of Grammy Award winner Joss Stone on 2 tracks but also a full blown orchestra on some tracks too. Joss Stone is an amazing vocalist with a gravelly voice way beyond her years and puts her stamp on the 1956 classic Screamin’ Jay Hawkins track “I Put A Spell On You” as does Jeff Beck with his wonderfully phrased blues licks.

Jeff Beck recorded Emotion And Commotion late last year at Sarm Studios in London with award-winning producers Steve Lipson and Trevor Horn. To create the album’s diverse sound, Beck used a number of musicians, including appearances by frequent collaborators Vinnie Colaiuta (drums), Jason Rebello (keyboards), and Tal Wilkenfeld (bass). The album also includes contributions from a trio of singers: Imelda May (“Lilac Wine“), Olivia Safe (“Elegy For Dunkirk“), and Grammy-winner Joss Stone (“I Put A Spell On You” and “There’s No Other Me“).

George “Buddy” Guy (born July 30, 1936) is an American blues guitarist and singer. Critically acclaimed, he is a pioneer of the Chicago blues sound and has served as an influence to some of the most notable musicians of his generation, including Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan. In the 1960s Guy was a member of Muddy Waters’ band and was a house guitarist at Chess Records. He can be heard on Howlin’ Wolf’s “Killing Floor” and Koko Taylor’s “Wang Dang Doodle” as well as on his own Chess sides and the series of records he made with harmonica player Junior Wells. read more

Not known for his acoustic work, Buddy Guy unplugs for a rare album-length excursion into folk blues. Continuing the rootsy, bare-bones approach that made 2001’s electric Sweet Tea (also produced by Dennis Herring) so gutsy and memorable, the guitarist gets down and dirty with 12 tracks that sound like they were recorded after hours in his living room or on his back porch. Guy’s stinging leads are still evident as is his emotive voice, but both are less flamboyant in the unplugged setting. Accompanied by spare stand-up bass and brushed drums, Guy sounds nearly possessed on covers from Skip James (“Hard Time Killing Floor”), Johnny Shines (“Moanin’ and Groanin’”), Son House (“Louise McGhee”), and John Lee Hooker (“Sally Mae”) among others. It’s a low-key, low-down affair made for late nights, rainy days, and the saddest of moods. Guy is just as convincing here–arguably more so–as on his barnstorming electric albums, making Blues Singer one of the bravest and most poignant albums in his catalog.

Hal Horowitz

Live In Austin, TX is the first official live bootleg by American blues rock duo The Black Keys. It was published as an electronic bootleg for podcast by Austin, Texas based Jumper Productions. This bootleg is derived from the 10,000 piece limited Thickfreakness In Austin music DVD-video released by the same company on September 7, 2004. Unlike the edited version available on the DVD, this audio version is full-length. The concert was recorded on October 24, 2003 at Austin’s Emo’s as part of the Thickfreakness U.S. tour. Near the end of “Them Eyes” a young woman from the audience suddenly climbed on stage and started to dance near the performers. Quickly after the song’s ending, guitarist Dan Auerbach switched roles from guitarist to lighthearted bouncer; he asked her off the stage with a quip “Hey girl, you play bass? What’s up?”.

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