Two videos were shot for the song. The first, directed by Reid Long, features footage from the band’s concerts, as well as candid shots of them on tour.

Will Hermes of Rolling Stone called the song’s keyboards “a serrated organ growl backed up with a SWAT team of hand claps” and cited it as an example of Danger Mouse’s prowess as a producer and co-writer.

Summarizing the song, Hermes wrote, “It’s Sixties bubblegum garage pop writ large, with T. Rex swagger and a guitar freakout that perfectly mirrors the lyrics, a paranoid rant that makes you shiver while you shimmy.” John Soeder of The Plain Dealer labeled it one of the album’s finest and said that it sounded like a hybrid of Norman Greenbaum’s “Spirit in the Sky” and Gary Glitter’s “Rock and Roll Part 2″.

Harley Brown of Consequence of Sound called the song “bombastic, slightly sleazy” and said that it “best sums up The Black Keys’ almost unbelievably consistent musicianship and success”.

Melissa Maerz of Entertainment Weekly said that the song, “with its swarm-of-bees organs and acid-trip gospel harmonies, could be a lost Nuggets gem”. Randall Roberts of the Los Angeles Times, writing about the song’s retro stylings, said that it “sounds as if it’s existed forever”.

Sam Richards of NME said that the song’s “brilliantly demented cowboy glam holler… is boosted by the band’s new trio of female backing singers wailing for all they’re worth”.

The Black Keys returned to Coachella with a neighborly hello and operated essentially as they have many times before at the festival, having worked their way up from an obscure Akron, Ohio duo on the smallest stages to a headliner in 2012. The production was bigger, with colorful graphics flashing on the huge screens around them, but the music remained rooted in the band’s commitment to jagged rock and blues. “Let’s get moving,” said singer-guitarist Dan Auerbach, wearing a studded black motorcycle jacket and drilling right into the tortured echo and stutter of “Howlin’ for You,” fleshed out with extra players on bass and heaving organ. But the core duo of Auerbach and drummer Patrick Carney frequently stripped things back down to just the two of them, ready to bash through the rawest, hungriest riffs and beats of “Your Touch” and other tributes to swampy blues.

This was a phenomenal performance. Auerbach radiated energy and the the audience responded in kind. It was the perfect balance of performance and appreciation. The music was terrific and the visuals were delightful. The many familiar favorites were played with inventiveness and spontaneity. Nothing was stale. The Black Keys had the entire audience on their feet from the first song to the last. All in all this was the most enjoyable concert experience I’ve ever experienced.

The production was bigger, with colorful graphics flashing on the huge screens around them, but the music remained rooted in the band’s commitment to jagged rock and blues. “Let’s get moving,” said singer-guitarist Dan Auerbach, wearing a studded black motorcycle jacket and drilling right into the tortured echo and stutter of “Howlin’ for You,” fleshed out with extra players on bass and heaving organ. But the core duo of Auerbach and drummer Patrick Carney frequently stripped things back down to just the two of them, ready to bash through the rawest, hungriest riffs and beats of “Your Touch” and other tributes to swampy blues.

This was a phenomenal performance. Auerbach radiated energy and the the audience responded in kind. It was the perfect balance of performance and appreciation. The music was terrific and the visuals were delightful. The many familiar favorites were played with inventiveness and spontaneity. Nothing was stale. The Black Keys had the entire audience on their feet from the first song to the last. All in all this was the most enjoyable concert experience I’ve ever experienced.

The Black Keys returned to Coachella with a neighborly hello and operated essentially as they have many times before at the festival, having worked their way up from an obscure Akron, Ohio duo on the smallest stages to a headliner in 2012.

This is concert coverage at its best. Camera movement is kept to a minimum, shots are steady, rarely is focus missed, and there aren’t a million short cuts trying to follow the music or tons of cuts back to crazy hippie dancers in the audience. The film tries very hard to let the music speak for itself and focus on the performers. Unfortunately there are a number of interviews or talking head moments in the film.

About half are good and informative, the rest are really annoying. Sadly there was some voice over during performances by Sonny Landreth, Bert Jansch, and Earl Klugh. In a way, the editor is saying, folk music, jazz, and instrumental is boring, he needed to spice things up with commentary. The film opens with a hokey drive around Chicago in an old convertible. I would have preferred one more song instead of this lead in.

Then on the 13th, in a side-stage segment, Haynes, Trucks and Gregg Allman performed Neil Young’s “The Needle and the Damage Done.” The eerie, autobiographical authority in Gregg’s voice – especially when he got to the personal resonance in the line, “I hit the city and I lost my band” – was gently matched by the mourning eloquence in Trucks’ acoustic, bottleneck lines.

Gary Clark, Jr., now a much bigger star than when he made his explosive Crossroads debut in 2010, was everywhere: jamming with Clapton’s guitarist Doyle Bramhall II; on the side in a rousing one-man-band appearance; and firing up “Bright Lights, Big City” at center stage on the 13th.

This year’s newcomers included Blake Mills, a touring guitarist and session player for Kid Rock, Band of Horses and Lucinda Williams. Mills made a quietly effective impact with his bottleneck and fingerpicking in the Santo and Johnny standard “Sleepwalk,” backed by the sumptuous ripple of Booker T.’s Hammond organ.

Another new entry, Quinn Sullivan, is a teenage protege of Buddy Guy. The lack of air in Sullivan’s precocious chops was no problem in Guy’s typically exuberant set. His learning curve – particularly the melodic advantages in deep breathing – was evident when Guy’s other guest, sacred-steel guitarist Robert Randolph, took off, alternating between his own busy ecstasies and long, smooth whines of slide and elegantly fluttering single notes.

It’s never too early to begin planning for the Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival. Keeping with the two-weekend format, organizers announced next year’s dates and your first opportunity to score tickets.

Of course, no lineup has been divulged. When Coachella announced its 2013 dates along with the initial onsale just about one year ago, organizers didn’t reveal who was playing the mega-festival until January.

Keeping the consecutive weekends scheme in play for the third year in a row, Coachella returns to the Empire Polo Club in Indio, Calif., April 11-13 and April 18-20, 2014.

Advance passes, including a limited number of VIP offerings as well as camping and tent packages, go on sale May 24 at 10 a.m. PDT. What’s more, you can pay for your tickets via Coachella’s nifty installment plan.

This year marked the Black Keys’ fifth trip to Coachella, and their debut as mainstage headliners. “I like to remember the first time we played Coachella, in ’04,” Carney says. “It was hot as fucking balls. We were sweating our asses off, and there were very few people there.”

“It was in a tent with no ventilation,” Auerbach adds. “It was the kind of hot where you’re completely drenched, except for the top of your head where the heat’s coming out of.”

Carney chuckles. “So if we can make it through that, which is basically, like, Navy SEALs hell week for rock & roll – this is, like, the Palm Springs retirement.”

“Yeah,” Auerbach says. “We made it. We’re, like, super-tough now. Tough as nails.”

Tonight, the Keys return to Coachella as the festival expands for the first time to a two-weekend blow-out. “We actually had a blue-light special at our agent’s office,” Carney deadpans. “Buy one, you get two.”

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